Surroundings

As you might have realised, this peninsula has, despite its relative closeness to the capital and the airport, a rather remote feel. We think it’s one of the best things about living here – a hint of the wild not too far from civilisation.

There is however not much to do here, if you’re not into forest walks, swimming in the sea, wild life or photography. 

This used to be a very busy agricultural area up until the 1960’s, with many dairy farms and several active fishing villages along the coast. Now it’s rather quiet, though it lives up in the summer with holiday makers and some community events centered around Midsummer and a week at the end of July. Most people living permanently here, have been here for generations, and there’s a large population of old people. Most people under 60 understand and speak English, but might be a little shy to do so. 

We will be happy to lend you maps of the area, and show you nice places for a walk or a swim. Once you are here, we will tell you more about the public right to roam, and what that right entails – do ask us, too!

There’s an 18th Century iron mill with a rather spectacular old stately home in Lövstabruk, that’s been turned into a culture centre which is worth a visit. It hosts a museum, two small galleries, a restaurant and a (cold) swimming pond.

Tierp has some shops, a swimming pool, banks, a proper pharmacy, a wine/liquor shop (Systembolaget), cinema and a pub.

There is a grocery shop a 30 mins bike ride away, it sells most things. One can order wine and beer from it, but it takes a couple of days.

Both Uppsala and Stockholm are good weekend destinations from us.

Be aware that it can prove tricky to use cash in many places, make sure you can use your debit or credit card. Many use their smartphones to pay for things that used to require cash, flea markets for example.

We recommend downloading the app Upplev Norduppland (choose mini destination Hållnäs) for updated suggestions of things to do in the area. Also


The idyllic surroundings aside, it’s worth mentioning that the Baltic coast, just like Russia, eastern Europe and parts of central Europe has ticks (the tiny insects) that spread Lyme disease (bacterial infection that can be treated with antibiotics) and TBE (a virus), the latter CAN be serious. TBE virus does not infect human to human, only from insect to human, by biting.

Generally, it’s enough to wear long trousers/sleeves when walking in high grass and forest, and check yourself for ticks often. In the attached information pack, there is more information about how to protect yourself and prepare for staying in an area with ticks.